Argentina · Managers · South America · World Cup 2010

A little history lesson for Diego

Since we’re on the topic of footballl criticism in Argentina (otherwise known as “sucking it”), let’s review a few criticisms, and, just for fun, I’m going to remove the names.
“Es una vergüenza para el fútbol argentino lo que jugó la Selección. Yo no quiero caerle a Passarella, pero no tengo más remedio”.
Translation: “The way the Selección playes is shameful for Argentine football. I don’t want to pick on __________, but I have no other choice.”
“Ver el partido del seleccionado fue como mirar una película de terror. Lo que hizo Argentina fue muy malo. No puede ser que Argentina, con toda la historia que tiene, salga a jugar con medio delantero”.
Translation: “Watching the game by the Seleccionado was like watching a horror movie. What Argentina did was very bad. It can’t be that Argentina, with all of its history, goes out to play with half a forward.”
“No me gustó para nada, fue para olvidar. Uruguay se equivocó dos veces y Argentina aprovechó bien. Fue técnica y tácticamente aburrido”.
“I didn’t like it at all. Uruguay made two errors and Argentina took advantage. It was technically and tactically boring.”
“Me preocupa que _________ pruebe con muchachos que seguramente no van a estar en el Mundial. Es un engaño”.
Translattion: I’m concerned that ___________ gives trials to kids that surely won’t be in the World Cup. It’s a fraud.”
“Después de los dos goles, el equipo empezó a jugar para atrás, cuando podría haber buscado variantes. Cuidar la pelota y jugar al toque para atrás está bien en una final contra Brasil, pero no ante Venezuela.”
Translation: “After the two goals, the team began playing towards the back (meaning defensively), when they could’ve looked for other options.  Keeping the ball and playing short touches to the back is good for a final against Brazil, but not agains Venezuela.”
If you notice a unique voice rising from all those quotes, you’re right. That’s Diego Maradona, speaking about the last four coaches Argentina had before him. In order, those quotes are about Daniel Passarella, Marcelo Bielse, José Pekerman and Alfio Basile.
Funny that any of these criticisms are entirely valid for the team as it stands today. And such criticism would be characterized by Maradona as being the malicious and capricious criticism that he’s had to suffer from the beginning.
The truth is that no Argentine manager had as much support as Diego did when he started, and the criticisms levelled at his team are the same sort of criticism he used on his predecessors.
So, as far as I’m concerned, Diego can suck it, and keep sucking it.
Translation: “Diego, que la mames y que la sigas mamando.”

Since we’re on the topic of footballl criticism in Argentina (otherwise known as “sucking it”), let’s review a few criticisms, and, just for fun, I’m going to remove the names.

“Es una vergüenza para el fútbol argentino lo que jugó la Selección. Yo no quiero caerle a ________, pero no tengo más remedio”.
Translation: “The way the Selección playes is shameful for Argentine football. I don’t want to pick on __________, but I have no other choice.”

“Ver el partido del seleccionado fue como mirar una película de terror. Lo que hizo Argentina fue muy malo. No puede ser que Argentina, con toda la historia que tiene, salga a jugar con medio delantero”.
Translation: “Watching the game by the Seleccionado was like watching a horror movie. What Argentina did was very bad. It can’t be that Argentina, with all of its history, goes out to play with half a forward.”

“No me gustó para nada, fue para olvidar. Uruguay se equivocó dos veces y Argentina aprovechó bien. Fue técnica y tácticamente aburrido”.
Translation: “I didn’t like it at all. Uruguay made two errors and Argentina took advantage. It was technically and tactically boring.”

“Me preocupa que _________ pruebe con muchachos que seguramente no van a estar en el Mundial. Es un engaño”.
Translattion: I’m concerned that ___________ gives trials to kids that surely won’t be in the World Cup. It’s a fraud.”

“Después de los dos goles, el equipo empezó a jugar para atrás, cuando podría haber buscado variantes. Cuidar la pelota y jugar al toque para atrás está bien en una final contra Brasil, pero no ante Venezuela.”
Translation: “After the two goals, the team began playing towards the back (meaning defensively), when they could’ve looked for other options.  Keeping the ball and playing short touches to the back is good for a final against Brazil, but not agains Venezuela.”

All quotes from Clarín.com: http://www.clarin.com/diario/2009/10/15/um/m-02019469.htm

If you notice a unique voice rising from all those quotes, you’re right. That’s Diego Maradona, speaking about the last four coaches Argentina had before him. In order, those quotes are about Daniel Passarella, Marcelo Bielsa (two quotes), José Pekerman and Alfio Basile.

Funny that any of these criticisms are entirely valid for the team as it stands today. And such criticism would be characterized by Maradona as being the malicious and capricious commentary that he’s had to suffer from the beginning.

The truth is that no Argentine manager had as much support as Diego did when he started, and the criticisms levelled at his team are the same sort of criticism he used on his predecessors.

So, as far as I’m concerned, Diego can suck it, and keep sucking it.

Translation (for Maradona’s benefit): “Diego, que la mames y que la sigas mamando.”

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